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April 19, 2010

Are You Making it Easy for People to Contact You?

You have just created a beautiful website for your business and you are excited and want the world to see what you are all about.  You carefully made sure all your links were working, that you included all the best content on your subject, you properly categorized your information and you are all ready to shout it out!  BUT, have you forgotten a very important thing?

Are you making it easy for people to find you?

Do you have your contact info on every page - does your contact info include not only your email address, but a telephone number and if appropriate, the snail mail address of your business.  Does it list the appropriate person's name in your company to contact for more information?  I see this happening quite a lot and was quite pleased to see this great article on this very subject.

Carol Tice, A journalist with Entrepreneur Daily Dose, Online Biz has written http://blog.entrepreneur.com/2009/10/5-things-i-hate-about-your-web-site.php

Are you "shooting yourself in the foot" and sabotaging your own marketing efforts?  I think this was a great reminder.  Thanks to Carol Tice for writing it.  I'm looking forward to reading more of her timely articles!

I'd love to hear your thoughts and comments on this topic - please post them in the comments section below!  If you really like this post, and want to Tweet about it, I'd really appreciate that too!

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Carol Deckert, Netweaving Expert

Carol Deckert is a Networking Coach and the the founder of Referrals Unlimited Network.  She has more than 8,500 first-level connections in LinkedIn and approximately 1,000 "friends" on FaceBook and more than 4,000 followers on Twitter! Carol knows you do need the numbers before you can accumulate quality connections, because not every connection will be a good one for you. Through her netweaving work, she helps others learn to do what she did, save them lots of time and heartache, by teaching them how to network efficiently and effectively. Contact Carol on Skype: Deckert1116

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December 17, 2009

Are You Keeping in Touch with YOUR Network?

Today, when I checked my emails, I found a very important message from one of my LinkedIn connections.  I wanted to share her message and my response because I feel there is a very valuable lesson to be learned.

Here is the message I received:

Good afternoon,

Hoping and praying all is well.  As I was sending out messages to my connections to see how they were doing, I received back a message that one of my connections, Jeff Regan had passed away on August 2.  This was a shock to me as I just assumed everyone is alive and well.

Jeff was a really kind man who always sent his connections update messages on what was going on in his life and how he may assist with his business.

I know we network here mainly for business purposes, but take time out to see how your connections are doing personally.

My response, while reminding myself that I need to do a lot more of this was:

We all pride ourselves on our networking abilities, but for some reason, seem to get bogged down in all other business activities, with the mindset that I'll do it later.  Later just keeps getting pushed back further and further and then we don't do it.  Pretty soon, it is lodged so far back in our memory that we just move on to other things.  All of a sudden, it's too late.

The connections you worked so hard to make, the relationships you were beginning to establish, and the ones that were already established could be completely demolished in a heartbeat!  Who wants to be known as a networker who does not have the energy, the compassion, the drive to keep in touch.  Do we only want to contact our network when we need something?  No, and I do mean, NO! hands-typing

Keeping in touch is so critical to our network.  Not only in having the opportunity to share good things with one another, but in the times when necessary, share some sad information that could prove to be beneficial in the support of the family members when something traumatic happens to one of our connections.  Take the example above, about Jeff Regan.  I feel so bad in the fact that although I didn't know Jeff well at all, if I had kept in touch, I might have known he was not feeling well, been involved in an accident, or whatever it was that caused his death.  I could have sent thoughts, prayers, general condolences to his family members during their time of grief.  I could have shown them I am a thoughtful, kind, compassionate person.  Isn't that what we want our network to think about us? More on Are You Keeping in Touch with YOUR Network?

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