Media/PR

September 28, 2009

Are you missing this easy opportunity to get magazine coverage?

If you aren't using editorial calendars to get more publicity and to build a powerful presence, you are missing on a great - and free - public relations tool. Understanding this all-important calendar can help your group coaching program  get some much-needed and best of all, free, exposure.

Besides including months and the year, these calendars bear little in common with the ones you are familiar with. An editorial calendar is a strictly functional item: there are no swimming suit models or adorable pets here, just lists of the significant issues and future features slated for future stories. While most people wouldn't be all that interested in these calendars, they can be a gold mine for savvy publicity seekers looking to get more coverage.

More than 7,000 publications in the U.S. and Canada publish editorial calendars and a few thousand do so for TV and radio shows.

Typically, editorial calendars can be found in advertising sales kits.  The calendar topics are included so advertisers can tie their ads into topics covered in the publication.

The smallest niche publications (those put together by a single enthusiast, for instance) generally don't work with an editorial calendar. Media outlets which are not supported by advertising may not use one - or just may not make it public. The same goes for publications whose content is entirely reader-contributed. Most new media outlets also don't use editorial calendars, since they're generally still trying to find their way in the industry.

There are even nationally recognized publications which don't use editorial calendars; these tend to be weeklies focused on current events (such as Time or People). These media outlets need to be flexible enough to cover events as they happen and can't plan within the confines of editorial calendars.

Once you've looked over a media outlet's calendar, you can choose which of their upcoming stories you may be able to offer your knowledge as a source. If you're looking at a trade journal, you may want to look at the calendar in terms of what topics you could offer an industry-insider opinion piece on.

Look over editorial calendars regularly, since these calendars are updated as the news dictates.

Don't wait to the last minute to pitch your idea, however. If the publication isn't working on a tight deadline, a good rule of thumb is that they will be looking for information about four months ahead of publication.

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Shannon Cherry, Publicity Expert for Group Mastery

Shannon Cherry, Publicity Expert for Group Mastery

Shannon Cherry is the publicity/media expert for Group Mastery, and the founder of Be Heard Solutions. Known as The Power Publicist, she helps coaches, entrepreneurs, consultants and solo professionals attract more clients and customers through the power of publicity. Grab your free publicity power pack to help you start establishing your media presence at http://www.beheardsolutions.com

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July 20, 2009

Publicity Strategies for Becoming The Go-To Expert

When you're looking for advice on a product or service you're interested in buying, it stands to reason that you'd seek out the opinions of an expert in the field. We all do this, whether consciously or unconsciously.

For example, people hear about nutritional supplements from well known physicians and nutritionists – and by and large, these are the products which succeed in the marketplace.

See how it works? It can work for your group coaching program, too! What you need to do is to make the public aware of the expertise you possess in your field – and when you need to get noticed, publicity techniques are the way to do it.

Before you begin trying to get attention, ask yourself this: are you enough of an expert to wow people with your knowledge? No matter how prepared you think you are, there's always room for improvement.

Keep current with the latest developments in your field and do as much research as you can; there's nothing worse than ending up in a situation where someone stumps you with a question.

Don't try to fake expertise, ever. It will come back to haunt you sooner than you think. With that out of the way, let's get down to publicizing your expertise:

  1. Writing: Write books, website content, write editorial pieces and submit them to your local news media; write in every medium possible to get the message that you are an expert out there. Try to include useful information in your content which will make people remember your name and seek you out in the future for your group coaching program.
  2. Radio and Television: Make an effort to be booked as a guest on any television or radio program which has guests. You may be able to do this yourself or with the help of a publicist, but being a guest on TV or radio programs exposes you (and your expertise) to a broad audience and makes people feel as if they know a little about you.
  3. Public speaking: Reaching broadcast media audiences is great, but there's no substitution to speaking to people in person and having a chance to meet them face to face. Practice your public speaking skills and start getting the word to civic organizations and businesses who book guest speakers. Look for both general-interest organizations and groups whose members tend to be interested in your area of expertise. Don't forget to mention you have a group coaching program. It could led to several sign ups on the spot!

The difference between being someone who knows something and someone who is an expert really comes down to recognition. If you want to position yourself as an expert to support your group coaching program (and believe me, you do!) then you'll need to conduct an aggressive publicity strategy to get the media exposure you need to build up your reputation as an expert.

Think of your name as a brand – when people know you, they'll want to come to you when they need your products or services; you're the expert, after all!

Shannon Cherry, Publicity Expert for Group Mastery

Shannon Cherry, Publicity Expert for Group Mastery

______________________________

Shannon Cherry is the publicity/media expert for Group Mastery, and the founder of Be Heard Solutions. Known as The Power Publicist, she helps coaches, entrepreneurs, consultants and solo professionals attract more clients and customers through the power of publicity. Grab your free publicity power pack to help you start establishing your media presence at http://www.beheardsolutions.com

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June 8, 2009

Are you making any of these mistakes when writing your press release?

Press releases are a great tool to attract more clients and get more sales, by using it both online and traditionally to media outlets.

Yet, many group coaches, speakers, consultants and other small business owners find it frustrating when results are lack luster. It often boils down to a few, but important, issues that can make a press release turn sour.

Take a look and see if you've made one of these errors:

1) Grammatical faux-pas: We all make mistakes, but it is highly important that you proofread your release several times prior to submission. A badly written press release can receive lots of views, but very few will use the release because it takes too much work to correct it.

2) Content: A good press release always has some form of content. Ensure that when you write your release that you excite the user and deliver exactly as promised in regards to the content. Do not have a title that misrepresents what you are offering in the body of the press release.

3) Advertising: As mentioned prior, always stay away from seeming like a commercial. A press release is a news related item. Do not try to pitch sales within the press release; always present the information as news related.

4) Exaggerated Comments: Stay away from hyping your news release with comments that seem far from the truth. Your press release must sound believable or it will be ignored. Do not fill your press release with hype and exaggerated statements that cannot be backed up.

5) Email: Never include an email address that you treasure and consider personal. Every press release can be made public; therefore if you post your email address within the press release you are subjecting yourself to the ever unfortunate spam offers.

6) Website: Some users actually forget to include a link to their website in their press release. Always include your website link, as more than likely it's what you are trying to promote. As a matter of fact, even when mentioning your business name in the release, consider using its domain name instead of its corporate name for more traction.

Shannon Cherry, Publicity Expert for Group Mastery

Shannon Cherry Media and Publicity Expert

_______________________

Shannon Cherry is the publicity/media expert for Group Mastery, and the founder of Be Heard Solutions. Known as The Power Publicist, she helps coaches, entrepreneurs, consultants and solo professionals attract more clients and customers through the power of publicity.

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