Marketing Implementation

Simple, yet effective marketing implementation strategies.

August 3, 2010

Sales Jargon and Cold Information Do Not Build Trust

mouseThe other day I stumbled onto the website of a business coach.   Two seconds after I got there, I was ready to click away.  I know I’m one of the most skeptical internet buyers out there so I’m always curious as to what makes me click away.  It keeps coming down to the same thing…sales jargon and cold information.

Let me define what I’m talking about first.

Sales Jargon - Pre-formed statements that supposedly get people to buy.  Things like “Sign up right now!”  “You’re going to love this.”  “You can’t live without this.”  That kind of thing.

Cold Information - Information for information sake, with no real value to offer.  These are the sites that explain exactly what you are going to get without telling you why you want it.  This feels cold.  Like there is no person behind it.  A robot could have written it.

For some people these tactics work great!  In fact, your website shouldn’t be devoid of these things.  You just need to add some of YOU into your website if you want clients to trust you enough to share their life stories with you.

Let’s go back to the website I saw the other day.  Most of the headlines were some sort of marketing jargon.  In between it was all information about building a business that I had heard 100 times before.  Now, yes, I do surf coaching websites all the time, so I’m more likely to have read it elsewhere.  At the same time, do you think your potential clients are going to go to your site without checking out others like it?  I doubt it!

Market to me without telling me your marketing. They are on your website.  They already know you are trying to sell them something.  Talk to your target market as if they are in the room with you.   Share with them that you know who they are by describing them.  What would your ideal client want to know up front?  Give them the information they need conversationally.  As if you were answering their question one-to-one….not one to masses.  That’s why it’s so important to get to know your ideal client. So, you know who they are and can speak to that.

Infuse your personality. I have editors that review my copy before I put it out on my website.  Many times they make suggestions to get rid of certain colloquialisms.  Usually, I ignore their advice because it’s MY words.  I want MY words out on that website so people can relate to me.  It’s important to use proper grammar and use correct spelling, but it’s also important to speak like you do in person.

I didn’t see a picture of the coach anywhere. In fact, there weren’t any graphics for me to connect with at all.  Just a bunch of words.  When I did finally find my way to the “about” page, I found even more information.  Information about the education of the coach.  I found information about how that coach works with their clients too.  That’s not going to cut it.  By the time I get to the end of this page I should have a sense of who this coach is and why they care about me.  Credentials, experience and the coach’s process substantiate that but if I’m going to trust you with my dreams then you have to give me a little more than that.  I want to know who you are as a person and as a coach.

Share with me. Tell me that you run marathons, enjoy time with your kids, play baseball in the summer, and go on a hiking retreat every year.  Substantiate your expertise with information about who you are and what you love.  Tell me that your mission is to help your clients find happiness in their lives, because you once weren’t happy.  Things like that will get my attention.

Your most valuable asset is not your list!  It’s YOU! Use it to your advantage.  What do you think?  What do you want to know?  Is there anything you want to change now?

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis is the Trust Marketing Expert for Group Coaching Mastery. She helps coaches and other personal transformation professionals establish trust through marketing.  First, she establishes a foundation that's rooted in your authentic differentiation. Then she follows up with solutions that bring consistency to everything that has your name on it — from your newsletter to your business card to your social media pages. And while she's happy to teach you how to do all this yourself, many of her clients love the way her team reduces their workload and overwhelm.

Greater trust means a shorter sales cycle, more of the right clients, and the confidence that comes from knowing your sales and marketing are in integrity with who you are as a person.

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July 19, 2010

Take Time Off and Maintain Trust

calendarI'm a firm believer in vacations, traveling and taking time away from my business office.  Every now and then, I disappear from my business.  Now, I know, some of you may think that's scary.  It even makes me a bit uncomfortable.  Just like so many solopreneurs, I wonder what my team will do if something they've never tackled before comes up.  I worry that I forgot to give them something.  This is all par for the course before I leave, but I DO leave and I DO forget about what's going on while I'm away.  I have to trust that my team can handle whatever comes in while I'm away.  Otherwise, I'd never enjoy it!

That doesn't mean I just throw my hands up in the air and say "I'm outta here!".

Not only do I need to trust my team to take care of my current clients, but it's extremely important to make sure my marketing efforts continue while I'm away so I don't lose any trust-building ground with potential clients.  When I'm in my business, I keep a marketing schedule and am very consistent with my marketing efforts.  If my marketing falls off or goes away completely while I'm out then potential clients forget about me, or wonder where I disappeared to.  Wondering chips away a few trust points.  So, I efinitely don't want to slack off on the marketing while I'm away.

In order to ease my mind, my clients minds, and my potential clients minds as much as I can, I have a lot to do in preparation for leaving.  Last year, I was pretty much out of my office for 3 of the 4 weeks in October.  I went on vacation and then attended a conference where I extended my trip for networking and client visits.  I spent the majority of September preparing to be out of the office.  I know what it takes to get there.  I'm hoping it will help you as well.  So, I thought I'd share with you my vacation preparation strategies.

1)  Do your writing and marketing in advance - When I sat down to do Septembers marketing, I gave myself some extra time to do both months of writing.  I always tell my clients that consistency is one of the main keys to successful trust-building.  This doesn't stop because I go on vacation.  I just pre-write verything and schedule it to go out while I'm gone.  Most marketing systems have this option.  I suggest you use it…OFTEN!

If you have someone helping you with your marketing.  Make sure you give them a heads up that it's coming early and make sure you get it to them early (this builds trust with your team members too, btw).  That way they know it's supposed to wait until the time you are away and it's not in addition to your usual marketing.

2) Have a team member in place - My Project Manager, Carrie, works very closely with me on a regular basis.  She knows what needs to get done when it comes to helping my clients with their work.  My clients are already familiar with her and have had communication with her fairly regularly.  This  makes Carrie the obvious choice to take over in my absence.

If nothing else, I think it's important to have someone who can handle your administrative duties.  Someone who schedules appointments, handles follow-up with potential clients when they need more information and can handle the intake process for you once a client decides to work with you.  This team member will have already had a connection with your clients.  So when you are away, they can easily answer e-mails or phone calls as they come in for you. This keeps the trust level high with current clients who will, hopefully, rave about you and refer more clients to you.

3)  Schedule a meeting with your helper - Whoever you decide to have help you, make sure you speak to them before you leave.  Cover all the reasons someone would contact you and give them a process for responding.  Give them all the resources they would need to get someone started working with you, in case someone wants to move forward.  Give them any numbers for people that help you with your business in case they need it.  Give them permission to use their best judgment and allow them to make decisions if necessary.  This way you don't come back to a line of people waiting to hear from you.  Some of them can be taken care of and on their way.   Potential clients who are ready to speak with you can already have an appointment scheduled with you after your return (and recoup time - see number 5, below) and have had someone respond to them

quickly, so they don't wait and wonder…again, wondering takes away trust points.

4)  Technology and e-mail - This is a major headache saver for you so you are ready to rock and roll when you return.  Give your helper access to the back side of your e-mail.  Either through the cpanel or a login to webmail.  Allow your helper to delete junk mail in that back end.  Give them permission to delete newsletters, advertisements, and announcements from online communities etc….  That way it never touches your inbox.  That way you come back ONLY to e-mails that are important.  This will keep you from inbox overload. You will quickly be able to jump back in and respond to people in the first day.

5)  Plan some time to get back in the groove - When you go away, you need to give yourself some time to catch up once you return.  You need to be rested, and focused when you return to your clients and start talking to potential clients. When I went away in October, I took the week after my return to catch up.  I had no calls scheduled.  I made sure I didn't promise anyone I'd get them something that week.  I had absolutely nothing going on that week by design.  This not only allowed me to get caught up, but it also gave me time to start implementing all that I learned from the conference I attended.  So, think about what you will want and need to do once you return and schedule accordingly.  You don't have to close off your schedule for a week, but at least a couple days. Don't get back and jump right in or you'll be in overload so fast your head will spin.  This does you, your clients and your potential clients no good.

I do these 5 things every time I step away from my business.  I have saved myself a lot of headaches by doing so and I've been able to maintain trust with potential clients, clients, and my team.  When I come back, I know that I will be able to handle catching up.  While I'm away, I know my business is in good hands and that things are getting done.  This helps me get over any doubts I have about whether I can take time away from my business.  Does it help you too?

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis is the Trust Marketing Expert for Group Coaching Mastery. She helps coaches and other personal transformation professionals establish trust through marketing.  First, she establishes a foundation that's rooted in your authentic differentiation. Then she follows up with solutions that bring consistency to everything that has your name on it — from your newsletter to your business card to your social media pages. And while she's happy to teach you how to do all this yourself, many of her clients love the way her team reduces their workload and overwhelm.

Greater trust means a shorter sales cycle, more of the right clients, and the confidence that comes from knowing your sales and marketing are in integrity with who you are as a person.

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June 29, 2010

Unfocused Focus

Power points

I preach to my clients all the time that they need to be consistent throughout all their marketing.  So, me saying Unfocused Focus sounds like quite the opposite doesn't it?  So, how can a detail-oriented, consistency preaching person like me talk about being unfocused? Well, I'll explain. Most of the time we hear everyone telling us that you have to be focused on the internet. Pick a niche, get specific, and go after your target market. You've heard that, right? They're WRONG!! Okay, well, sort of wrong.

Here's the thing. You DO need a specific niche for your target market. You DO need to be targeting them and attracting them through everything you do on the internet. This kind of focus is very important for increasing your trust factor with potential clients.

HOWEVER, don't forget you also want to attract other types of business support.

Do you want affiliates?

Do you want joint venture partners?

Do you want to speak?

Are you always looking for team members?

Are their others you'd like to attract to help build your business?

Then you need to get a little unfocused and add in places for these other people to come to you. For example, your website. Here you are focused on attracting your target market. You want to move them through your sales funnel and make them a regular client, right? GREAT! Now, let's get a little unfocused for a second. I have an affiliate program for my products. So, not only do I have information that will attract my clients, but there is also a link for anyone interested in my affiliate program.

The key is to LOOK focused (which my home page does), but be slightly unfocused and include little places here and there for those who can help grow your business to latch onto.  After all, there's a built in level of trust when someone is referred to you or has an experience of you when you speak etc…  So, you want to take advantage of that!

twitter-birdOne more example is social networks. I'm on Twitter all the time. I talk a lot about what's going on in my business. I put information out that will help potential clients, as well. I'm not JUST there to get clients though. I also am looking for JV partners, affiliates, speaking gigs, and to get to know some REALLY cool people. Many people would say that's too unfocused. No, it's not. My main conversation revolves around what I do for a living (FOCUS). However, I do throw in other things here and there to make sure my partners can see how we are a good fit (UNFOCUSED). I'm also sharing things about who I am as a person. This is three-fold, it gets my clients interested, it attracts other business owners who share my interests AND the transparency is a huge trust-builder for all groups (FOCUS). So, it's unfocused focus.

So, are you just focused? Or are you sprinkling in some unfocused marketing? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis, Trust Marketing Expert

Kristen Beireis is the Trust Marketing Expert for Group Coaching Mastery. She helps coaches and other personal transformation professionals establish trust through marketing.  First, she establishes a foundation that's rooted in your authentic differentiation. Then she follows up with solutions that bring consistency to everything that has your name on it — from your newsletter to your business card to your social media pages. And while she's happy to teach you how to do all this yourself, many of her clients love the way her team reduces their workload and overwhelm.

Greater trust means a shorter sales cycle, more of the right clients, and the confidence that comes from knowing your sales and marketing are in integrity with who you are as a person.

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