Persuasion, Influence

April 8, 2009

An easy checklist for determining whether a marketing vehicle is suitable for your campaign

Exposure. Look at what kind of exposure you are looking for and how a particular vehicle can get you that exposure. For instance, a website or a blog is open, accessible and available to anyone, anywhere, any time, 24/7/365.

Suitability. Is this means of marketing actually suitable to your target market’s needs and habits? And for that matter, is it suitable for the image and message you are aiming for?

Variety. Variety is the spice of life, and often of marketing too. You can’t put all of your eggs in one marketing vehicle’s basket. You need to spread the wealth, so to speak, and get the message out in a number of ways. So don’t spend all your time on one web page or one blog entry, always look at the big picture and use all of the suitable outlets you can.

Flexibility. How well can you manage, change, update and work with this vehicle? Can you post content yourself or are you at the mercy or someone or something else?

Credibility. Free always sounds nice and many of us jump at something that seems like a good deal. But it may be a tacky or unprofessional or inconsequential site or service, so be careful not to waste your time and your resources.

You have a certain message and image that you are looking to get out at all times. Be consistent about that – don’t compromise just because you think you have found a good deal.

Allison Nazarian is the Copywriting Expert for Group Mastery.  She is well- and widely known as one of the most honest, experienced, innovative and freshest voices in copywriting and marketing today.

This blog post was reprinted with permission from the author.

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March 30, 2009

How to create more, more and more copy and content for your website and blog

The key to creating content (copy) for your website, blog and press materials is to consider your audience.
You must give your readers fresh, useful, newsworthy information that they’ll use.

  • Determine what topics will interest them.
  • Make a list of online and offline publications that will help you stay up-to-date and be sure to read them regularly.
  • Become an expert on all things relating to the services or products you are selling and the people who need them.
  • Pay attention to the questions your clients and prospects are asking you. Chances are, your answers will be of interest to your audience.
  • Check out blogs, forums and other online networking sites. What are people talking about?
  • Take general news and tie it into the specific needs and wants of your market.

Allison Nazarian is the Copywriting Expert for Group Mastery.  She is well- and widely known as one of the most honest, experienced, innovative and freshest voices in copywriting and marketing today.

This blog post was reprinted with permission from the author.

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March 22, 2009

Writing a Call to Action that Gets Results

When you are writing marketing material, the right call to action can make all the difference.

No matter what you are selling, your call to action should be as specific as possible and written for your audience. Your goal is to motivate them to buy what you're selling.

Know what you want them to do
You have to know what you want your customers to do to get the results you expect. Do you want them to download a free report? Buy something? Visit your website? Make sure that your intentions are clear.

Make your call to action visible
Don't bury your call to action somewhere in the middle of a densely written paragraph where it could be missed.

Whether you state it in the beginning, the middle or at the end of your copy, make sure that it can clearly be seen. Make sure it stands apart from other copy by using white space, attention grabbing sub headlines or a bulleted list.

  • Make sure the call to action is clear
    Don't leave your readers guessing about what you're asking them to do. Make your message very simple and actionable.
  • Make it compelling
    Show your readers how your product or service benefits them upfront. Let them know why they shouldn't refuse your offer.
  • Create a sense of urgency
    Give readers a time period to respond to your offer. Experts say setting a deadline increases your response.
  • Repeat the call to action if you direct readers to a website
    This is very important if you want your customers to buy or sign up for something. Repeating your call to action reminds them of what you want them to do.

Allison Nazarian - Copywriting Expert
Allison Nazarian is the Copywriting Expert for Group Mastery.  She is well- and widely known as one of the most honest, experienced, innovative and freshest voices in copywriting and marketing today.

This blog post was reprinted with permission from the author.

Permalink Print Comment
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